World War II American General Officers' Project

 

 
 
 

A project dedicated to the study of the American General Officer and the preservation of their original uniforms, flags and medals.

General Horace Fuller

      Commanding one of the first Infantry Divisions in the Southwest Pacific Theater General Horace Fuller led the 41st Infantry Division from April 1942 to June of 1944. During his command attacks were made on Salamaua, Hollandia, and Biak. However,  It was during the Biak campaign that General Fuller encountered stiff resistance from the well dug in Japanse defenders.  This delay meant his division was unable to meet the time table demanded by General MacArthur to have Biak island secured. General MacArthur superseded Fuller’s command of the Biak operation and placed General Robert Eichelberger in overall command but left Fuller in command of the 41st This event led General Fuller to ask to be relieved of command of the 41st. While this request was not received well, Fuller was relieved and went on to be Deputy Chief of Staff Southeast Asia Command.

 For his service with the 41st General Fuller was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal with the following citation:

               General Horace Fuller demonstrated exceptional ability and sound judgment in bringing his division to high standards of efficiency in preparation for jungle combat. He successfully commanded his division in the defense of the Oro bay-Gona area and in operations against the enemy from Gona to Morobe, while elements of his division participated in the landing at Nassau Bay and the subsequent drive on Salamaua. Later he led his division in the amphibious assaults against Hollandia and Biak Island. Elements of his division made the successful landing at Aitape and in the Wakde Island-Sarmi area. In all his attacks he inflicted decisive defeat on an experienced enemy. His personal courage and inspiring leadership made possible the able expedition of assigned missions, and contributed materially to our success in dislodging the enemy and forcing him to relinquish his conquests.


 
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